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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 25-28

Knowledge and perception about basic life support among dental interns: A questionnaire survey


Department of Public Health Dentistry, National Dental College and Hospital, Derabassi, Punjab, India

Date of Web Publication3-Jul-2018

Correspondence Address:
Amandeep Chopra
Public Health Dentistry, National Dental College and Hospital, Dera Bassi, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nnjcr.nnjcr_51_16

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  Abstract 


Background: Knowledge of basic life support (BLS) is an absolute necessity for dental professionals to face acute dental emergencies. Aim and Objectives: The present study was aimed to assess the awareness, knowledge, and perception about BLS among dental interns of Dera Bassi, Punjab and further to determine self-rated ability to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation/BLS including knowledge of automated external defibrillators. Methodology: A descriptive questionnaire study was done on 99 dental interns. Questionnaire consisted of 19 questions which included the data pertaining to demographic details, awareness, and knowledge of BLS. Descriptive statistics were compiled. Further, comparison based on gender was done using independent t-test. Results: All the study participants were aware of the BLS and its usefulness. The mean knowledge score was found to be 11.13 ± 2.64. 3%. Most of the study participants (36.04%) were having average knowledge followed by fair knowledge score (29.30%). Females were having more BLS knowledge as compared to males. Conclusion: The study indicates average knowledge of BLS among dental interns. The present study highlights the need for a structured training of BLS and inclusion of BLS in the dental academic curriculum.

Keywords: asic life support, dental interns, knowledge


How to cite this article:
Chopra A, Shyam R, Dhingra S, Verma S, Kaur A, Kaur H, Kaur G. Knowledge and perception about basic life support among dental interns: A questionnaire survey. N Niger J Clin Res 2018;7:25-8

How to cite this URL:
Chopra A, Shyam R, Dhingra S, Verma S, Kaur A, Kaur H, Kaur G. Knowledge and perception about basic life support among dental interns: A questionnaire survey. N Niger J Clin Res [serial online] 2018 [cited 2022 Oct 5];7:25-8. Available from: https://www.mdcan-uath.org/text.asp?2018/7/11/25/235862




  Introduction Top


Cardiac arrest is an important acute emergency situation both within and outside the hospital setups and carries a high level of mortality risk. However, if early basic life support (BLS) – cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is initiated; the survival rate can be substantially improved. The knowledge of BLS (CPR) is a major determinant in the success of resuscitation and plays a vital role in the outcome of acute emergency situation. The purpose of BLS is to maintain adequate ventilation and circulation until a means can be obtained to reverse the underlying cause of the arrest.[1]

Delay in commencing effective life support can result in a very poor outcome for the individual, with the highest chance of survival being, if CPR is commenced by well-trained staff within 2 min of an arrest.[2]

Cardiopulmonary arrest and deaths have been reported in dental clinics.[3],[4] The lack of training and competence to deal with these emergencies can have tragic and legal consequences.[5] Knowledge of BLS is an absolute necessity for dental professionals to face acute dental emergencies.[6] Hence, the present was carried out among dental interns of Dera Bassi, Punjab to assess the knowledge, and perception about BLS and further to determine self-rated ability to perform CPR/BLS including knowledge of automated external defibrillators.


  Methodology Top


A cross-sectional study was carried out after obtaining ethical clearance from the Institutional Ethical Committee among dental interns. A pretested semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data.

The original version of questionnaire was pilot tested to determine the test–retest reliability. Content validity was done by the panel of the experts in this field. The participants who participated in the pilot study were not included in the final sample.

The final questionnaire had 21 questions stating the demographic detail, knowledge, perception, and practice. After obtaining the informed consent from each participant, each one was asked to fill up the provided questionnaire in 20 min in front of the investigator to avoid any malpractice while answering the questionnaire. The participation was voluntary and anonymous.

Statistical analysis

Data obtained were tabulated using Microsoft excel computer program and calculations were made using SPSS V22.0 (IBM, Chicago, USA). Descriptive statistics were computed. Percent knowledge score of study participants was categorized as follows.

Further, comparison based on gender was done using independent t-test. P ≤ 0.05 were considered significant.


  Results Top


The final study sample consisted of 99 dental interns (36 males; 63 females) with mean age of 22.02 ± 2.02 years (range 21–24). The mean knowledge score was found to be 11.13 ± 2.64.

[Table 1] depicts correct responses for knowledge-based questions among study participants. Only 15.8% of study participants were having knowledge about management of victim submerged in water and 36.5% have knowledge about management of chocking in obese person.
Table 1: Responses for knowledge-based question

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Based on participants percentage knowledge score their knowledge level was categorized as poor, average, fair, good and very good [Table 2]. [Figure 1] depicts the average percentage knowledge on BLS/CPR among dental interns. Most of the study participants (36.04%) were having average knowledge followed by fair knowledge score (29.30%).
Table 2: Categorization of participation knowledge level based on percentage knowledge score

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Figure 1: Percentage knowledge among dental interns

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The knowledge score was found to be higher among females than males which was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.026) [Figure 2].
Figure 2: knowledge Score based on gender

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[Figure 3] depicts experience of study participants toward the BLS. 8.5% of study participants have attended BLS program. Only 6.5% had faced emergency requiring BLS, and 4.3% have performed resuscitation. 30.4% of study participants had observed person performing BLS.
Figure 3: Experience of study participants

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[Figure 4] depicts perception of study participant's toward BLS. 35.4% of study participants were aware of Heimlich maneuver, 52.6% were confident in performing BLS. 92.9% of dental interns feel that they should be trained in BLS and 95.7% feel it is useful to know about BLS.
Figure 4: Perception of study participants

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  Discussion Top


Basic life support is a basic need for the dental practitioners to face emergencies during their clinical period. Hence, the above survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and perception of dental intern on basic life support.

This cross-sectional study was simple and low cost, and data were collected relatively quickly. Adolescents of both gender were included to take into account the gender differences. The study was carried among dental interns because internship is a crucial period just before they reach out to the community as health-care providers.

The results of this study indicate that the most poorly answered or lowest knowledge areas were the objective questions such as management of victim submerged in water, management of chocking in obese person, depth of compression during CPR and sequence of chain of survival. The American Heart Association advocates a “chain of survival” for all victims needing CPR including - early recognition of a victim, early CPR, rapid defibrillation, effective advanced life support, and integrated postcardiac arrest care.[6] The common factor in all is an inadequate awareness and knowledge among dentists regarding BLS.[7]

Only 8.5% of dental interns had received/attended BLS training program which is in concordance to survey conducted by Singh et al. where only 12% had received practical training and survey by Baduni et al. where none had received any formal training.[8],[9]

This study has some limitations, such as the convenient sampling method and self-reported questionnaires that may cause several biases including recall and social desirability bias. Practical skills of basic life support could not be assessed in this study.

However, the main strength of our study is that it is the first study, to our knowledge, to assess the awareness, knowledge, and perception about BLS. Moreover, public health personnel and decision makers may use our study for future comparisons.

The requirement for adding BLS (knowledge, awareness, and performing technique) in curriculum of dental profession should be initiated. Further, efforts should be made by administrators to streamline necessary modalities in educational preparation and assessment for CPR/BLS (both theoretical knowledge with practical demonstrations) to make our future health-care providers fully fledged.


  Conclusion Top


Dental interns have average knowledge about BLS. Females were having better knowledge than their male counterparts.

The perception of BLS among dental interns was positive and most desire to have detail knowledge on BLS and also need to practice it in a good setup. Little percentage of study participants had ever attended the BLS program, faced the emergency requiring BLS, and had performed resuscitation. There is need for a structured training of BLS and inclusion of BLS in the dental academic curriculum.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ragavan S, Schneider H, Kloeck WG. Basic resuscitation – Knowledge and skills of full-time medical practitioners at public hospitals in Northern province. S Afr Med J 2000;90:504-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chandrasekaran S, Kumar S, Bhat SA, Saravanakumar, Shabbir PM, Chandrasekaran V. Awareness of basic life support among medical, dental, nursing students and doctors. Indian J Anaesth 2010;54:121-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
Phillips PS, Nolan JP. Training in basic and advanced life support in UK medical schools: Questionnaire survey. BMJ 2001;323:22-3.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Hunter PL. Cardiac arrest in the dental surgery. Br Dent J 1991;170:284.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Brahams D. Death in the dentist's chair. Lancet 1989;2:991-2.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Zheng ZJ, Croft JB, Giles WH, Mensah GA. Sudden cardiac death in the United States, 1989 to 1998. Circulation 2001;104:2158-63.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Sasson C, Rogers MA, Dahl J, Kellermann AL. Predictors of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2010;3:63-81.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Singh K, Bhat N, Nagaraappa R, Sharda A, Asawa K, Agarwal A, et al. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Knowledge and personal experience among dentists in Udaipur, India. J Dent Sci 2011;6:72-5.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Baduni N, Prakash P, Srivastava D, Sanwal MK, Singh BP. Awareness of basic life support among dental practitioners. Natl J Maxillofac Surg 2014;5:19-22.  Back to cited text no. 9
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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